What Do You Mean You Are Highly Motivated?


Are You Saying You Can Be Bought?

The dictionary defines motivated as: to provide someone with a motive or reason to do something. In return for doing something the motivated individual receives money, power, profit, rewards, promotions, recognition, raises, bonuses, acknowledgement, new job, a job or anything else the “motivated” individual may value.

The definition implies we do things for a reason which could be as simple as “out of the goodness of our hearts”, but when it comes to employment that is seldom the reason. In essence no one is inherently motivated; there is a reason for their motivation and the greater the reason or reward the more highly motivated someone will typically be.

If Your Profile or Resume States You Are Motivated or Highly Motivated; What Motivates You?

I am frequently asked and I regularly choose to read many profiles and resumes which often times state the individual is motivated or highly motivated. The question I ask is what is the source of the motivation?

There are many individuals, as well as professional resume and profile writers, who include this statement but I have not found a single profile or resume stating the source of their motivation. If you are going to put it on your profile or in your resume; you had better be prepared to have a good explanation as to what motivates you.

My Motivation Story

Many years ago I worked for IBM as a Systems Engineer. I wasn’t much for being in the office; I loved being in the field with my customers and that is where I spent my time. Because I was seldom in the office I frequently did not hear about things when they were told to everyone else (the days before email).

One day I was in the office and heard about this great dinner a couple of my co-workers and their spouses had attended with our manager and his wife. I learned the dinner was a reward for winning a monthly sales contest. My interest was piqued and I asked what I had to do to participate. They laid out the rules for me and from then on I was one of the winners month in and month out. I was motivated! The reward was worth the effort.

What Is Your Motivation?

If someone were to ask what motivates you; how would you answer? Would you respond pay, recognition, promotion, reward or what? I believe it would be a tough question to answer without sounding self-serving, patronizing or insincere.

However, for your own understanding it’s a great question to answer. Knowing what motivates you can help you as you make career decisions.

Motivated or Highly Motivated; Does it Make a Difference?

Do you remember the movie “A Few Good Men” with Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson and Demi Moore. There is one courtroom scene where the prosecution asks a question and the Demi Moore character says, “I object” and the judge overrules her objection. Demi’s character then says, “I strenuously object” and of course the judge overrules again.
As they point out in the movie what does it mean to “strenuously object”.

Whether it’s highly motivated or strenuously objecting it’s simply an adverb added to a verb. Don’t do it!

Motivated or Highly Motivated: Does the Recruiter or Hiring Manager Really Care?

Although being motivated may sound like a good thing to say; recruiters and hiring managers don’t care! I am still waiting to see a job posting asking for someone who is motivated or highly motivated. If you see one, please send the link to me. Until then, I will stick with the position it is wasted words.

Once you are hired your manager may start caring as they get to know you and understand what makes you tick; but initially it’s a moot point and making the statement may hurt you more than it helps!

Conclusion

Whether it is your profile or resume; you don’t have real estate to waste and putting motivated or highly motivated is just wasting important space. Make every word count and have a purpose.

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My name is Tom Staskiewicz and my goal is to help everyone do a little better, get a little further and reach the success they are destined to achieve!

Do you need help with your message? Are you struggling for people to know you and what you have to offer? If so, I can help. My contact information is below or Email  Me Now! and lets get started.

Whatever I can do to help you or anyone to move forward in reaching your goals; I’m all for it. Connect with me on LinkedIn, Like me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Check out the UPPROACH site and sign up for our newsletter of career tips and ideas for job seekers, small and medium business owners, self-employed individuals, contractors, consultants or whatever; anyone wanting to move their career forward!

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You Say You Are Results Oriented; but Does Your Summary and Experience Support Your Claim?


Does Your Profile Say You Are Results Oriented?

If So, Does Your Detail Support Your Claim? I’m amazed at the number of times I see someone make the statement “Results Oriented” but in reading the remainder of their summary or work history; there are no specifics of the results achieved.

You Cannot Make a Positive Impression if You Cannot or Do Not Support the Claim

Some say they are avoiding stating some or all of their accomplishments, because it’s the process of “tooting your own horn”, but they are wrong: you must do it! You can’t simply expect the reader to believe it solely because you said “results oriented”. It just doesn’t work that way! You must explain the value you brought and the results you achieved otherwise it’s simply a couple of unsupported words.

Humility Has No Place in Your Resume and Profile!

It’s nice to be humble and it’s a great trait to have; but you cannot allow your humility to overshadow your accomplishments! As long as you are honest in your statements and details and if you have worked hard and set yourself apart from your peers; you must tell the recruiters, hiring managers, prospective business partners, clients, prospects and customers.

If you fail to support your claims the people you want to join with will not pay attention. They are looking for people with the answers and abilities they need; they do not have time to try to figure out the missing information. If the information is missing, they will move on!

Other Frequently Unsupported Statements

The statement stating “Results Oriented” is just one example of a frequently unsupported claim. Some other common claims include:

  • Motivated;
  • Excellent communicator;
  • Creative;
  • Passionate;
  • Clear Thinker; and
  • Team Leader.

You may be one or all of these things and whether you are or not; is not my point. My point is don’t just say it; show it! Give examples in your summary and experience; get people to write meaty, meaningful recommendations describing your talent and how you were able to use those skills and the outcomes. Go back to the old PAR strategy; Problem identified; Action taken; and Results achieved.

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Credibility: Your Most Important Ability


Do You Have Credibility with Your Network?

You may have many skills and abilities, but if your credibility suffers or you have no credibility: you have a problem! If your credibility is called into question people will not hire you, will not refer you and will do all they can to avoid you.

Your Credibility Is Key to Successful Networking

Whether you are meeting someone face-to-face, through a Social Network or on-line using Skype or Google+; you must be able to quickly begin establishing your credibility. If your new connection doesn’t see you as credible the relationship doesn’t have the necessary foundation to blossom.

Face-To-Face Meetings

If you are meeting face-to-face; you may be able to create credibility by simply being a good listener. Many people like to talk and being a good or great listener can get you far along the path of credibility. Of course, you may leave the conversation with a not-so-great impression of the other person; but you have done your part to sell yourself and that is important!

Meeting Through Social Networking

When you are meeting someone through social networking the content of your profile must carry the load for you and allow people to draw a positive conclusion about who you are and your values. Your profile must establish your credibility!

Your credibility is established with your headline, picture and summary. Your credibility is enhanced by the completeness of your experience, education, skills, interests, recommendations (given and received) and skills.

An incomplete or sketchy profile leaves questions in the mind of the person viewing your profile. Depending upon the reason for the visit a poor profile may cause them to leave and never return. Are you prepared to run the risk?

I have read many profiles where the intent appears to be convincing the reader of the profile owner’s credibility; that’s the wrong way to go about it! You can’t tell people about your credibility; you need to show actions which allow people to come to their own conclusions either on their own or with input from others; if you are depending upon your ability to convince them… Good Luck!

Meeting On-Line

When you are meeting on-line you must be prepared and present yourself properly; again this is your chance to make a great first impression and start establishing your credibility. This is not the time to be in sweats, curlers, pajamas or anything other than business casual to professional attire.

If you are meeting on-line, you also need to ensure all of your technology is working properly and you know how to use it correctly. This is not the time to be learning. I’m speaking somewhat from experience. I was doing an on-line meeting and I wasn’t prepared; fortunately it wasn’t our first meeting so I had been able to build some credibility; it suffered a little from the fiasco, but I was able to eventually recover. These are mistakes you don’t need; especially with a new contact.

Your Focus Must Be on Building Your Credibility and Success Will Follow

When you have credibility you can often overcome missing skills, experience, education and other characteristics. Having all the characteristics, skills, experience and education, however, cannot overcome a lack of credibility!

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Are There Stalkers on LinkedIn?


Are There Stalkers on LinkedIn?

I believe there are stalkers and I see them as anyone who chooses to view profiles anonymously!

Here is the scenario…

Somebody is watching you! They have checked out your LinkedIn profile and maybe they have done Google, Bing and other searches on you. Who are they? What do they want?

I was just looking at my LinkedIn statistics to see who has been viewing my profile. I saw several names, but some chose to remain anonymous. Why is that? Are they stalkers? Are they afraid of being identified? Are they ashamed? Should I be worried? I don’t know!

If this were happening outside your front door most people would be more than a little uncomfortable. So what’s the difference between stalking your house and stalking your profile; neither time identifying yourself?

Remaining Anonymous Is Bad Behavior

Yes, LinkedIn allows you to do some things anonymously and in some cases it’s perfectly okay. However, I don’t like the idea someone can come in, read my profile (or whatever I choose to make public) and remain anonymous. I don’t think it’s right and I don’t feel it is appropriate networking behavior; it’s very one-sided!

I Like to Know Who Is Reading My Profile

Personally, I like to know who has stopped by to read my profile. If someone has taken the time to view my profile, I like to reciprocate and look at their profile. Maybe there is a synergy which would make connecting worthwhile for both of us. Regardless, I deserve the opportunity to look and to know who is looking!

Effective Networkers Don’t Hide Behind Anonymity

Effective networkers are looking for opportunities to connect where there is a mutual benefit. You won’t find them lurking in the background, keeping themselves anonymous and leaving others wondering about them. Effective networkers are open because they are looking for ways to build their credibility and trust.

It Would Be Great if LinkedIn Allowed Us to Be Anonymous to Those Who Choose to Be Anonymous

Wouldn’t that be a great personal setting? If someone tries to access your information anonymously you could shut down anonymous viewers and prevent their seeing your profile. Being open with others who are open makes sense and that’s why I keep my profile open.

Networking is your opportunity to build credibility and trust! Hiding behind anonymity does the opposite. People are looking for reasons to believe you are credible, honest and trustworthy; don’t mess it up!

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My name is Tom Staskiewicz and my goal is to help everyone do a little better, get a little further and reach the success they are destined to achieve!

Do you need help with your message? Are you struggling for people to know you and what you have to offer? If so, I can help. My contact information is below or Email  Me Now! and lets get started.

Whatever I can do to help you or anyone to move forward in reaching your goals; I’m all for it. Connect with me on LinkedIn, Like me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Check out the UPPROACH site and sign up for our newsletter of career tips and ideas for job seekers, small and medium business owners, self-employed individuals, contractors, consultants or whatever; anyone wanting to move their career forward!

Is Closing Your LinkedIn Account the Answer to Annoying Calls?


Is Closing Your LinkedIn Account the Answer to Annoying Calls?

I saw a friend of mine the other night and after exchanging some pleasantries I asked if he had closed his LinkedIn account because I was no longer seeing him on LinkedIn. He said he had. He was finding many of his unwanted calls were from people who found him on LinkedIn. He didn’t like the calls, so he closed his account. Was this a good idea?

People Expect to See Your Profile On LinkedIn

The expectation today is you WILL have a profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn started as a place for business professionals to network but it has rapidly grown to become the professional/business networking site for all walks of life. “If you are not there; you are square.”

Your co-workers, customers, vendors and others expect to find your profile on LinkedIn. If your profile is not there; the conclusion is you must have a problem. Either you are hiding something, hiding from someone or you are a really poor networker and do not understand the value and importance of a network.

Who Are You Attracting?

If you are receiving annoying calls because of your LinkedIn profile; maybe it’s the way you’re advertising yourself! The reality is many unsophisticated networkers search LinkedIn for “C” level executives, directors, purchasing agents and numerous other high profile positions solely to promote their products and services. People in high-level positions play into these searches by listing their current title as their headline or tag line.

LinkedIn even exacerbates the problem because, by default, your current job title automatically becomes your headline unless you uncheck the box “Update My Headline To” when it appears. You DO NOT want your title as your headline! Listing your current title serves no one other than a person looking for someone in your position.

The Funny Thing About Titles

Many people get caught up in the importance of their own title and want to display it proudly; maybe even brag a little. The truth is if you are the CEO, CFO, COO, CIO or any other “C” positions of Podunk, Inc.; no one cares! Most likely the people seeing Podunk, Inc. have no clue about the company and until they have more information: do not care! Not only are you making yourself a target for marketers; the information you provided tells your audience absolutely nothing about the value you offer!

However, if you are the CEO of Coke, Proctor and Gamble, Macy’s Department Stores or some other large easily recognized company; your title will mean something and it will also draw a lot of attention – unwanted attention. So unless you are with a large company using the C-level title has intrinsic value; otherwise it is wasted effort.

Your Headline Should Be Your Value Statement; Not Your Title!

This is where people go wrong with their profile and invite the unwanted attention. If you have a title in your headline you are making yourself an easy target. Your headline should tell your reader about the value you offer. Your headline, next to your name, is your most prominent piece of information – as a headline should be; so make sure it draws the attention you want!

When You Do Your Headline Properly the Unwanted Phone Calls Will Be Reduced and May Stop

Because your headline is prominently displayed and has high value as searchable information; you must focus on your value proposition. What is it you offer that people want and will search to find?

I can have a headline which says I’m a Realtor or my headline can say Realtor Specializing in West Linn, Oregon Homes; which tells your audience more? I could go further and say “Realtor in West Linn, OR specializing in high end homes.” If I’m not interested in people searching for low end or starter homes; I am filtering them out with my headline. Some may call regardless, but I’m doing my best to get the prospects I want.

Deleting your profile is a solution to unwanted calls based upon your LinkedIn profile, but it is a drastic response to a fixable situation. Before you take this action; look at your profile to identify the cause of the unwanted attention and make some changes.

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My name is Tom Staskiewicz and my goal is to help everyone do a little better, get a little further and reach the success they are destined to achieve!

Do you need help with your message? Are you struggling for people to know you and what you have to offer? If so, I can help. My contact information is below or Email  Me Now! and lets get started.

Whatever I can do to help you or anyone to move forward in reaching your goals; I’m all for it. Connect with me on LinkedIn, Like me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Check out the UPPROACH site and sign up for our newsletter of career tips and ideas for job seekers, small and medium business owners, self-employed individuals, contractors, consultants or whatever; anyone wanting to move their career forward!

Does Your LinkedIn Profile Give You the Credibility You Need?


Does Your LinkedIn Profile Give You the Credibility You Need?

Your profile has a job to do and it’s not SEO (Search Engine Optimization)! I’m not saying SEO isn’t important; but it’s a by-product or secondary consideration not the primary purpose of your profile. The first or primary purpose is to establish your credibility!

Why Is Credibility So Important?

Whether someone finds your profile using SEO, clicks on your name when you like or comment on a post or clicks your name when you connect with someone; your profile must convey credibility. If it cannot meet this requirement your profile is a wasted effort!

How Do You Build Credibility

There are multiple steps to building credibility.

Step 1

The first step to building credibility is to have a complete profile. Let your audience know you are serious in your efforts. If your profile is incomplete or sketchy what message are you sending?

It’s a message of indifference and one which does not respect the time of your audience. If they clicked on your name and found an incomplete profile, you just wasted their time and that’s not cool. Do you like it when others waste your time? Probably not, so why is it okay to waste your audiences’ time?

Can you imagine going to a concert and learning the brass section isn’t there to perform? You would be quite mad you had taken the time to show up for the performance. Did the lack of a brass section add to or take away from the credibility of the orchestra or band? Obviously the entire organization lost credibility because of the actions of a few.

So it is with your profile the lack of or incomplete information in a section takes away from your credibility!

Step 2

Put a real, current picture on your profile. Thinking you are fooling someone about your age or appearance by leaving off a picture is just fooling yourself. Somewhere along the line the Internet has a picture of you and whoever is looking for you will find it.

The other reason to post your picture is with millions of members there will be others on LinkedIn with the same name. Your picture will be the method someone may use to ensure they are connecting with the correct person. Help them out, don’t miss out on a contact because they cannot verify you.

Your picture adds to your credibility.

Step 3

Put your location with your profile. If your profile simply says United States, are you real? If you are real; why are you so secretive?

You are building credibility and hiding information will not serve you!

Step 4

You must be participating on LinkedIn. Whether you are posting, commenting, liking, sharing in groups or making new connections; you need to have activity showing you are not just a lurker or a phantom profile.

There are a lot of lurkers and phantom profiles on LinkedIn and you don’t want to be one of them! You want people viewing your profile to know you are a real person and see the value you bring.

Your participation lets people know who you are because every post, every comment helps your audience gain a better understanding of who you are.

Your participation says you are real and adds to your credibility.

Step 5

Grow your network! When you are growing your network you are adding value, not only to yourself, but to all the members of your network as well. When members of your network perform searches for individuals, companies, job roles, skills, talents, etc. the size of your network helps them and the size of their network helps you.

The power of your network is not in your first level connections or strong ties; the power is in your second and third level connections or weak ties. Every person you bring into your network means their connections just added to your weak ties and every person you bring in adds weak ties to every member in your network.

Adding connections builds your credibility because it shows your commitment to your network and your network members.

Your profile is all about building your credibility in the eyes of your audience. You want your audience to come away from reading your profile feeling they have an understanding of your honesty, integrity, reliability, sincerity, trust, knowledge and credibility. If your profile does not convey these characteristics; your profile is not doing the job and must be revised.

Read my other posts in this blog for help in constructing a profile which conveys your credibility. Please take a moment and sign up for email notifications of new posts. It’s in the upper right corner and takes just a moment.

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My name is Tom Staskiewicz and my goal is to help everyone do a little better, get a little further and reach the success they are destined to achieve!

Do you need help with your message? Are you struggling for people to know you and what you have to offer? If so, I can help. My contact information is below or Email  Me Now! and lets get started.

Whatever I can do to help you or anyone to move forward in reaching your goals; I’m all for it. Connect with me on LinkedIn, Like me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Check out our career site and sign up for our newsletter of career tips and ideas for job seekers, small and medium business owners, self-employed individuals, contractors, consultants or whatever; anyone wanting to move their career forward!

LinkedIn Character Limits – Fishing for Answers


LinkedIn Character Limits – Fishing for Answers

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Each section of your LinkedIn profile has a limit on the number of characters allowed. Knowing your limits is important as you craft effective statements and descriptions.

  • First Name – 20 characters
  • Last Name – 40 characters
  • Headline/tagline – 120 characters
  • Status Updates – 140 characters
  • Summary – 2000 characters
  • Company Name, Position/Title – 100 characters
  • Position Description – 2000 characters
  • Skills and Specialties – 40 entries
  • Interests – 1000 characters

I will be using a fishing analogy as I talk about the sections of your profile.

Your Professional Headline or Tagline

120 Characters

Your tagline or headline is your bait. Different species of fish have different tastes in the bait they chase. When you know the type of fish you want to catch; you will know the type of bait to use. The same is true for your headline; different people will respond to different information. You must know what you want, find out what you are getting and, if necessary, change what you are saying!

Your LinkedIn headline or tagline is your bait on LinkedIn. This piece of information follows you around on LinkedIn and the Internet. You have 120 characters available to describe the value you have to offer and entice your prospects to “nibble” for a little taste. It is sad how some people waste this space by simply displaying their job title. Does it really say much if your tagline says “Partner”, “CEO”, “Sales Manager” or something similar? This is simply not enough to draw them in unless you are the CEO of Coca Cola, Microsoft, Proctor & Gamble or some other well known organization. Read my article Put Your Name in Front of 20,000 People with Your LinkedIn Headline

Status Updates

140 Characters

As I said with the headline/tagline different fish respond to different types of bait. Your LinkedIn profile is no different.

Your status updates are another form of bait which shows up on your connections’ news feeds. When your connection makes a comment on your status update, your update will show on the news feed for all of your connection’s connections.

Your status update is limited to 140 characters the same as Twitter

Summary Section – Your Story

2000 Characters

Your summary section can be up 2000 characters; following the fishing analogy your summary is your hook. When you are fishing, the bait is extremely important but if you put it on the hook incorrectly the fish will take the bait, but not the hook. Different types of fish, because of their size, require different hooks . No one hook will work with every type of fish. Likewise, no one story will excite every reader! Watch your profile statistics and look at the profiles of those who view your profile; are they your target readers? If not, your message may require tweaking!

There are different schools of thought when it comes to the summary. Some say use all 2000 characters and others recommend keeping it brief. My recommendation is to use however many characters you need to tell your story; of course not exceeding 2000 characters. Leave plenty of white space and make it easy to read. Check out my article Are You Really that Boring – Your LinkedIn Summary Must Reel Your Audience In

Company Name and Your Position or Title

100 Characters

This field is searchable, outside of LinkedIn, so think about how you want to use these 100 characters. You could use your title, but you could also include something more descriptive of the actual role you filled. You want to make your profile work for you!

Position Description – This Is Your Experience

2000 Characters Each

Your experience is where you reel in your prospects: customers, recruiters, hiring managers, etc. Each experience allows up to 2000 characters of information; each piece being a little more enticing as your story unfolds. Each experience should be a little vignette or short story into your career. For a detailed description of this section check out my article LinkedIn Experience Section – Record it Correctly

Your Specialties and Interests

40 Skills or Specialties

Your specialties and interests are a list of up to 40 characteristics or skills you have attributed to yourself. Your connections can provide endorsements for these characteristics. They are simple endorsements where a connection says they endorse you for the skill. Nothing more, nothing less.

Interests – Conversation Starters

1000 Characters

This is an interesting free form section. You have 1000 characters where you can record your interests. To me this is an overlooked section because it opens the door to virtually endless possibilities and conversation. Your interests are the opportunity to build your relationship with your reader on another level.

Are you looking to meet someone and you want to find commonality with the individual beyond experience, skills and abilities; this is the place to look? Ideally you will write things which are of interest to you and hopefully to them, for example:

  • Are you a golfer?
  • Do you play tennis?
  • Are you a master seamstress?
  • Are you a chess master?
  • Do you enjoy mountain climbing?
  • Do you ride a bike to work?
  • Do you like exotic travel?
  • Do you collect seashells?

LinkedIn character limits shouldn’t be looked at as constraints; instead think of them as guidelines to make you more effective in your writing.

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My name is Tom Staskiewicz and my goal is to help everyone do a little better, get a little further and reach the success they are destined to achieve! Whatever I can do to help you or anyone to move forward in reaching your goals; I’m all for it. Connect with me on LinkedIn, Like me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter.

Check out our career site at http://toyourcareersuccess.com and sign up for our newsletter of career tips and ideas for job seekers, small and medium business owners, self-employed individuals, contractors, consultants or whatever; anyone wanting to move their career forward!